Lesson of Vietnam

The Washington Post
June 11, 2007

The Iraq war has reawakened memories of Vietnam – the most significant political experience of an entire American generation. But this has not produced clarity about its lessons. Of course, history never repeats itself exactly. Vietnam was an episode in the Cold War, a combination of geopolitical and ideological conflict that did not challenge the […]

Read more

The Icon and the Eagle

International Herald Tribune
March 20, 2007

Ambivalence characterizes relations between Russia and the United States. President Vladimir Putin snipes at American conduct and policies, while his foreign minister reaffirms Russia's interest in a partnership with the United States. Washington seeks Russian assistance on nonproliferation while pursuing policies on Russia's borders that Moscow and many Russians consider highly provocative. In the meantime, […]

Read more

What an International Conference Can Do

The Washington Post
March 1, 2007

The announcement by Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice that Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is calling two international conferences of all Iraq's neighbors, including Syria and Iran, to discuss the country's future could mark a watershed. Whatever happens on the battlefields, Iraq will have to rejoin the global community in some manner. Otherwise, its internal […]

Read more

Stability in Iraq and Beyond

The Washington Post
January 21, 2007

President Bush's bold decision to order a “surge” of some 20,000 American troops for Iraq has brought the debate over the war to a defining stage. There will not be an opportunity for another reassessment. The Baker-Hamilton commission powerfully described the impasse on the ground. It is the result of cumulative choices – some enumerated […]

Read more

He Moved with Calm

Newsweek
January 8, 2007

I first met President Ford in the mid-1960s, when I was a professor at Harvard. I was conducting a defense-policy seminar. It was customary to invite people from Washington, and I invited President Ford, then a congressman, to come and talk about the appropriations process. We stayed in loose touch afterward. When I came to […]

Read more

A World Free of Nuclear Weapons

The Wall Street Journal
January 4, 2007

Mr. Shultz, a distinguished fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford, was secretary of state from 1982 to 1989. Mr. Perry was secretary of defense from 1994 to 1997. Mr. Kissinger, chairman of Kissinger Associates, was secretary of state from 1973 to 1977. Mr. Nunn is former chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Read more

Deal With Tehran, Not Its Crusade

The Washington Post
November 24, 2006

Iran's nuclear program and considerable resources enable it to strive for strategic dominance in its region. With the impetus of a radical Shiite ideology and the symbolism of defiance of the U.N. Security Council's resolution, Iran challenges the established order in the Middle East and perhaps wherever Islamic populations face dominant, non-Islamic majorities. The appeal […]

Read more

Denuclearizing North Korea

The Washington Post
November 12, 2006

Two negotiations conducted thousands of miles apart by a largely overlapping group of participants may well determine the prospects of world order. In Beijing, the United States, China, Russia, Japan and the two Koreas are negotiating about the North Korean nuclear program; in Vienna, the so-called E-3 (Germany, France and Britain) occasionally meet with an […]

Read more

After Lebanon

The Washington Post
September 13, 2006

Two conceptions dominate public discussion on Lebanon. The first is that Hezbollah is a traditional terrorist organization operating covertly outside the law. The second is that the cease-fire marks an end to the war in Lebanon. Neither conception is valid. Hezbollah is, in fact, a metastasization of the al-Qaeda pattern. It acts openly as a […]

Read more

The Next Steps With Iran

The Washington Post
July 31, 2006

The world's attention is focused on the fighting in Lebanon and the Gaza Strip, but the context leads inevitably back to Iran. Unfortunately, the diplomacy dealing with that issue is constantly outstripped by events. While explosives are raining on Lebanese and Israeli towns and Israel reclaims portions of Gaza, the proposal to Iran in May […]

Read more